openfield farm petaluma

Paradise Found: Openfield Farm, Petaluma

There are people who have dreams and then there are people who make their dreams come true and in the process make the world a better place. Sarah and Seth James, the visionary, hard-working husband/wife team behind Openfield Farm in Petaluma, CA, fall into the latter camp. I recently got wind of their new “farm stand” CSA-based farm, which grows up to 50 varietals – from heirloom beans to sweet peas – and boasts a grass-fed herd of Corriente beef cattle, and decided to pay them a visit.

Their 500+ acre farm, set in rolling hills on the site of an old dairy farm, is  just a few minutes outside of Petaluma. Turning off Spring Hill Road, an automatic gate swings open to reveal a straight, unpaved, road which takes you directly to the promised land. This is a place where nature is right at home and seems to work in harmony with the farm. On the short drive in I spotted a small red kite soaring through the sky, a huge big hawk taking a brief respite on a fence post before swooping in on his prey, and numerous other busy birds darting about.

road to openfield farm

With a cloud of dust behind me and the crunching of gravel to announce my arrival, I pulled into the parking lot to be immediately greeted by Rosie, the uber-friendly and very obedient sheep dog. She obligingly sat so I could take her picture before leading me to the pretty barn where I found Sarah, a petite blonde, and two of her young kids, setting up for the members’ Friday pick-up. > Read more

pistachio_dip

Cortney Burns Previews Recipes From New Bar Tartine Cookbook

Cortney Burns, co-chef at Bar Tartine in the Mission district, is one of those rare creatures in the kitchen: creative, industrious, leaning on age-old techniques like fermentation, and always managing to remain positive and sunny, no matter how little sleep she’s had. Burns and her co-chef, Nick Balla, are releasing their new cookbook “Bar Tartine: Techniques and Recipes”  on November 25, this year.

Cortney recently taught a class at SF Cooking School, giving local home cooks (including moi) an opportunity to prepare and eat recipes from the upcoming book. If you’ve ever dined at Bar Tartine, you’ll know that “layering flavors” as Burns calls it, is quintessential to each of their dishes. Using seasonal produce, snout-to-tail animal products, fermented vegetables, sprouted grains, and a wonderful fusion of Japanese and Eastern European cooking techniques, the result is a complex yet deeply satisfying array of flavors in every bite. > Read more

Harley Farms, Pescadero

Harley Goat Farms, Pescadero, CA

When I was in my twenties and thirties I dreamed of living in a Grecian olive grove surrounded by goats wearing tinkling melodic bells. The herby-smelling warm air. The rustling of the silvery olive leaves in the breeze. The occasional bleating of goats carrying through the gloaming. It all seduced me, yet somewhere along the way I lost sight of that dream. Today I have olive trees in the back garden and a couple of Labradors. It’s not quite what I had in mind, but it works. But whenever I run into goats, as I recently did at Harley Farms in Pescadero, a little scent of that dream nudges my memory cells.

If you haven’t been to Pescadero, it’s a charming small village, just south of Half Moon Bay off Highway One. It’s just far enough inland that even on the foggiest of days you can find the sun trying to break through and warm things up a bit. There’s a serious coffee shop, the Archangeli family’s general store is known for amazing artichoke bread, preserves and more, wine tasting, and a few other cool spots to browse through antiques, knick-knacks and art. This time though, we drove down the main street and took a right in search of all things goat.

Pescadero coffee > Read more

Duck Soup Inn

Duck Soup Inn, San Juan Islands

If you’re not familiar with the San Juan Islands, they’re a small chain of four islands a ferry ride away from Seattle in the gorgeous North West. Accustomed as I am, to the golden state of California, the more emerald, dramatic Washington State, which benefits from a far more frequent and heavier rainfall than its southern cousin, feels quite different. On a recent trip to stay in Friday Harbor, which is the main village on San Juan island itself, we dropped in at the Duck Soup Inn for dinner.

cauliflower soup

Touted as one of the island’s best restaurants we were excited to sample the local produce. The restaurant is in a woodsy setting about a 15-20 minute drive outside of Friday Harbor.  Overlooking a green, lush pond, inside the quaintly-named, Duck Soup Inn, is cabin-like and rustic. You can imagine the place being snug and cozy, heated by a wood fire on a chilly, rainy day.

All the main dishes come complete with soup and salad so you don’t really need to order an appetizer, although we were tempted to try a couple. Okay several. Soup of the day was cauliflower and it was pleasingly smooth and pretty. The chips on the salad were quickly devoured, but the salad could have been properly tossed vs. just having the dressing drizzled over the top.

Salad at Duck Soup Inn > Read more

Molly and Lisa, Thistle Meats

Thistle Meats – the new butcher on the block

Thistle Meats, a new butcher and charcuterie in Petaluma, Sonoma Co., is the brainchild of Molly Best, a stay-at-home mom with a passion for rearing sheep, and Lisa Modica, a former environmental consultant. Their new shop, on Petaluma Boulevard, opened a few months ago following a year of planning and renovations.

The women, who each have two young children, followed an unusual path to opening their butcher shop. As they tell their story, one reason their partnership works so well becomes clear: Best is energetic and lively, while Modica exudes a calm, Zen-like aura.

Best, a breeder of Dorset sheet, who once contemplated starting up a sheep dairy and being a cheese-maker, had long fantasized about running her own butcher shop, but with young kids, felt it was at least five years from being a reality. Then the stars started to align: Best’s new neighbor (now mentor) turned out to be Francois Vecchio, a Salumiere, Charcutier & Wurstmeister with over 50 years’ experience, and Modica left her job in San Francisco and began to consider her next steps.

The two women started to brainstorm with their friends in January of 2013. “We knew we wanted to do something, but we weren’t quite sure what it was going to be,” says Modica. “Initially, we were going to create a magazine for the local community,” says Best, “but there came a point where I just couldn’t picture myself doing it.” > Read more

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